Oakbrook Preparatory School

Middle School Volleyball winning the game of life

Random Acts of Kindness

The middle school volleyball team is practicing for games, but they are also practicing harder for the game of life.

The team is going through the fruits of the spirit with Coach Erin Biggar and assistant Coach Hall. Right now, they are focusing on the fruit of kindness.

During their devotion, they discussed Ephesians 4:32 Be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you.  

Coach Biggar decided this would be a great opportunity for the team to do some random Acts of Kindness. So, with the support of their parents and coaches, the girls will be doing the following: 

Over the weekend- they are asked to do the following: 

*Get together a care pack for a person in need: toothbrush, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, deodorant, hairbrush (this can be gotten at the dollar store). They will bring these back to school on Monday, and Mrs. Hall will distribute them to a local ministry. We will attach the same quote as above in each care pack. 

They will also come home with a laminated sheet that explains the next four numbers in better detail. These can be easily done over the weekend, as well. 

 1. help someone for free

 2. help someone w/ yard work

 3.hold the door for someone

 4. let someone go in line in front of you

The last thing we will do for our random acts of kindness, as a team, we will volunteer our time to read and help with homework at Knight Shift on September 23 from 3:15-4:00 for our devotion day. 

From Coach Biggar: “Coach Hall and I are extremely excited about this and hope that you will feel the same.  These girls are amazing and they have such sweet hearts.  Thank you for allowing us to be part of their lives.”

Mr. Hinds and the rest of the administration is certainly proud of the leadership by Coach Biggar and Coach Hall and how they are training hearts, not just bodies. Go Knights!

Religious liberty attorney David Gibbs speaks to AP Government classes

Attorney David C. Gibbs III, president and general counsel of the National Center for Life and Liberty, spoke to Oakbrook's AP Government students today and shared his experiences arguing cases before the U.S. Supreme Court.

Attorney David C. Gibbs III, president and general counsel of the National Center for Life and Liberty, spoke to AP Government students today and shared his experiences arguing cases before the U.S. Supreme Court.

Gibbs, who represented the Schiavo family in the highly publicized Terri Schiavo case, also hosts the weekly radio program Law Talk Live on the Moody Radio Network and has authored five books including Fighting for Dear Life and Understanding the Constitution. He has also been featured on many major news and talk programs.

Gibbs discussed several issues facing our state and national government, including healthcare and the national debt, and encouraged students to understand and fight for their beliefs.

"It's important for students to be mentally engaged so they can become the leaders that God intended them to be," Gibbs said.

AP Government student Slade Glenn said he was excited to hear Gibbs speak today.

"He has a lot of experience and it was interesting to hear him explain how it's not the government that gives us our rights, but it's the government that can take away those rights," said Glenn, a junior at Oakbrook.

"I agree with him that it's important for my generation to get involved and understand the laws that are going to have a lasting impact on our next 30 years or so."

"We are gracious that David Gibbs, as someone particularly involved with issues of religious liberty and education, could share his insights about government with us today," said AP Government teacher Jonathan Clayton. "Mr. Gibbs highlighted important issues currently being addressed in the court system which will impact students when they are pursuing their own careers in the years ahead as well as contextualizing those issues within the intentions of the framers as individuals who composed the document establishing our government to be read along with the Bible."

Gibbs graduated from Duke Law School and manages the Gibbs Law Firm with offices in Dallas, Texas; St. Petersburg, Florida; and Washington, D.C. He is admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court and numerous federal circuit and district courts nationwide. He has also been admitted to the State Bars of Florida, Minnesota, Colorado, North Dakota, Ohio, Texas, Tennessee, Michigan, and the District of Columbia.

Going global: AP World History uses technology to expand the classroom

Oakbrook's AP World History demonstrated the power of global collaboration as they Skyped with Indian professor Sajina Sarathy, who explained in detail of India's Golden Age during the Gupta Empire and gave firsthand cultural knowledge of the caste system that continues to shape social life and opportunities in India today.

Today's digitally connected world provides more opportunities to share, learn, and connect on a global scale. 

Oakbrook's AP World History demonstrated the power of global collaboration as they Skyped with Indian professor Sajina Sarathy, who explained in detail of India's Golden Age during the Gupta Empire and gave firsthand cultural knowledge of the caste system that continues to shape social life and opportunities in India today.

 "The students were able to ask him questions and hear honest answers from one who knows the culture and whose view of history is not shaped through the eyes and opinions of the west, that is important as a student of history," said AP World History teacher Merissa Ramantanin. 

"It was one of the best classes ever," said senior Dylan Mittag. "We were able to learn from a different cultural perspective and gain unique insight that a textbook wouldn't have been able to give."

Each week the class also participates in a history lab and explores multiple avenues of research to have a better understanding of a people and culture of history. Today, they will perform an autopsy of an ancient civilization, which involves researching the cause of their decline, specifically what weakened them and led to their demise.

"The students will focus on the brain, the heart, as well as the hands and feet of the individual civilizations. The brain for their thoughts, the heart for their belief systems, and the hands and feet for the works they accomplished," Ramantanin said. 

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Construction set to begin Monday, Sept. 21

Our front entrance construction project is set to begin Monday morning. The project will include a new entrance and exit onto campus, a traffic circle to improve traffic flow, a welcome sign, wayfarer signage, and landscaping.

We have shared the exciting news with you several times since school has started that a generous donor agreed to improve the first impression to our campus. 

Our front entrance construction project is set to begin Monday morning. The project will include a new entrance and exit onto campus, a traffic circle to improve traffic flow, a welcome sign, wayfarer signage, and landscaping. 

Throughout the construction process we will be entering and exiting through Innovative Fibers, the factory next door. Please proceed with caution as you drive through the temporary gates. 

This project should take 3-4 weeks to complete. We appreciate your patience as we improve the look and functionality of our entrance onto campus.

Below are maps showing you the directional flow of traffic during construction. Our current gate will be closed. The area that will create the most challenge will be taking a hard right after entering through the temporary gate to proceed to the primary and main buildings (see red circle below).

If you have any questions or concerns that you feel we need to be aware of during the construction process, please contact David Foy, Kyle Boyles, or Adair Hinds.

 

 


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